Pet Sematary

Poster for the movie "Pet Sematary"

Pet Sematary Quote: “First I play with Jud. Then mommy came, and I played with mommy. We play, daddy? We had an awful good time Now, I want to play with you” – Gage Creed

“Pet Sematary” might be Stephen King’s biggest ’80s movie hit, but is it any good after 30 years? That depends on whether you value good moviemaking over good writing.

Find out what The Ramones had to do with getting this movie made, why you shouldn’t let your cat outside, when it’s safe to picnic in Maine, why Fred Gwynne sounds like a ’40s detective, and why Cemetery is spelled Sematary.

Kerri Gross, Dick Ebert, and Gene Lyons also cover:

  • horrendous parenting skills
  • even worse fence-building skills
  • when open-casket funerals make sense
  • when infants are the best actors in a movie
  • and how fast a toddler can actually run.

How did nobody call PETA on this one? Was this the first actually scary movie we reviewed? Who the hell edited this thing?

Find out in this week’s super-spooky edition of Shat The Movies!

Plot Summary: “Pet Sematary” Doctor Louis Creed (Dale Midkiff) moves his family to Maine, where he meets a friendly local named Jud Crandall (Fred Gwynne). After the Creeds’ cat is accidentally killed, Crandall advises Louis to bury it in the ground near the old pet cemetery. The cat returns to life, its personality changed for the worse. When Louis’ son, Gage (Miko Hughes), dies tragically, Louis decides to bury the boy’s body in the same ground despite the warnings of Crandall and Louis’ visions of a deceased patient.

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Not rated yet!
Director
Mary Lambert
Producer
Richard P. Rubinstein
Production
Paramount
Release Date
21 April 1989

Not rated yet!
Director
Mary Lambert
Producer
Richard P. Rubinstein
Production
Paramount
Release Date
21 April 1989