Tag Archives: 1985

Back to The Future (1985)

Back to The Future Quote: “Don’t worry. As long as you hit that wire with the connecting hook at precisely eighty-eight miles per hour the instant the lightning strikes the tower… everything will be fine.” – Dr. Emmett Brown

In this 1980s sci-fi classic, small-town California teen Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) is thrown back into the ’50s when an experiment by his eccentric scientist friend Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) goes awry. Traveling through time in a modified DeLorean car, Marty encounters young versions of his parents (Crispin Glover, Lea Thompson), and must make sure that they fall in love or he’ll cease to exist. Even more dauntingly, Marty has to return to his own time and save the life of Doc Brown.


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Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985)

Rambo: First Blood Part II Quote: “If winning means he has to die – he’ll die. No fear, no regrets. And one more thing, what you choose to call hell, he calls home..” – Colonel Trautman

In case you were wondering: No, “Rambo: First Blood Part II” does not hold up. Unless you served in the U.S. Army or really hate computers. From unimaginable POW rescues to an impossibly glistening Sylvester Stallone, this 1985 action drama is the Father of All Action Movie Tropes. Find out what song makes Big D cry, what scenes make King Bee cringe, and what Gene Lyons actually liked about this utter betrayal of its “Rambo” predecessor.


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Breakfast Club (1985)

Breakfast Club Quote: “Screws fall out all the time, the world is an imperfect place.” – Bender

High School was a very different place for teenagers back in 1985. There were no cell phones, lockers were still in use, and there was this strange building on campus called the “Library” that housed books and delinquents on Saturdays.

In this week’s review, Rog, Big D, & Gene explore the hit film “The Breakfast Club”. We explore whether or not the themes of teenage angst, High School stereotypes, and John Hughes-style diversity still hold up over 30 years later. Continue reading Breakfast Club (1985)