Scarface (1983)

After getting a green card in exchange for assassinating a Cuban government official, Tony Montana (Al Pacino) stakes a claim on the drug trade in Miami. Viciously murdering anyone who stands in his way, Tony eventually becomes the biggest drug lord in the state, controlling nearly all the cocaine that comes through Miami. But increased pressure from the police, wars with Colombian drug cartels and his own drug-fueled paranoia serve to fuel the flames of his eventual downfall.

Scarface Quote: “Say hello to my little friend.” – Tony Montana

Want the Shat Crew to really invest in a movie review? Give us something to relate to! Let Roger the vaper talk about life as a sorta’ Cuban. Let Big D talk about the proper use of an M16A1 grenade launcher. Let Gene explain foreign slang and immigration.

Listener Dale commissioned Al Pacino’s “Scarface,” opening the door to lengthy discussions of naming bongs, laughable riot scenes, questionable audio quality, whitewashed Latin-American roles, and why Roger doesn’t do cocaine.

The boys also lament Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio’s melodramatic shitshow of an acting job, talk way too much about the Synth Community, outline how “Scarface” mirrors “The Great Gatsby” and “Macbeth.”

Plot Summary: “Scarface” After getting a green card in exchange for assassinating a Cuban government official, Tony Montana (Al Pacino) stakes a claim on the drug trade in Miami. Viciously murdering anyone who stands in his way, Tony eventually becomes the biggest drug lord in the state, controlling nearly all the cocaine that comes through Miami. But increased pressure from the police, wars with Colombian drug cartels and his own drug-fueled paranoia serve to fuel the flames of his eventual downfall.

Subscribe Now

Help Support the Podcast

You may also like...

1 Response

  1. Chris says:

    Regarding the Gina incest issue with Tony, that and the final fountain statue scene are holdovers from the Howard Hawks director’s cut version from 1933. I had a chance to watch it in a film class back in college, and Scarface was narratively meant to be portrayed like a crude, primitive type (including the actor’s gait, suggesting a more ape or Neanderthal type performance).

    During the climax of the film, it’s outright stated how Scarface wants a romance with his sister, while the sister goes along with it drunk on his power and success.

    The 1983 Gina scene is yet another modern revision with a little more subtext, but like “2001”, if you don’t see the source material, the monkeys tossing bones doesn’t make any sense.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.